33 responses to “What I learned from work experience in publishing: Meta-data and keywords for book marketing #AuthorToolBoxBlogHop

  1. Hi! It’s actually quite helpful for anything, I would think. I know when I write a blog post, I need to create search words, and that would be true also when I’m posting something to promote my book. I need to use the correct keywords to lead searches to my post. Great info 🙂
    Leslie

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks 🙂
      I think I’m a bit spoiled with WordPress, it does most of the hard work for me, I just have to tag! You’re right, keywords are invaluable in online retail and in getting a website up the search rankings too 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Excellent explanation 🙂 I practice keywords when adding tags to blog posts and hashtags to content on social media. I love it when I start typing something into a search engine and it fills in what it thinks I’m searching for – “rottweiler turning white” was an interesting find and might end up in a story about the Cù Sìth 😉

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    • Thanks Ronel 🙂
      I love using tags on blog posts, and WordPress is very good at picking keywords from your blog posts for you, which is a bonus!
      It’s fun to see what google thinks you’re searching for! Some of them are bizarre! That sounds like a fun story idea though 🙂

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  3. Great tidbit from the cave of the official book dragons. I find tagging blog posts much easier than trying to find the right meta-data on sales platforms which are effectively balanced between well-sought and non-competitive. I never considered including names of review sources before; will have to check that out.

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      • Welcome, I’m glad you liked your own special tag ;p
        Yes, and none of the platforms actually give you any feedback data on which of your tags helped get your book noticed. E.g. if Amazon provided some sort of data on the sales report that indicated which search words directed customers to your book page, such as what we get on WP, showing us even which platform is the referrer. When we update our meta-data on sales platforms, we could be altering an input that has been working great for us already.

        Liked by 1 person

    • You’re welcome 🙂
      I’d love to have added where to use them, but I didn’t find out during the experience, and I’m not completely sure.
      I think, on Amazon at least, if you create a brand new listing there is a section for keywords. WordPress, as far as I can tell, automatically picks up keywords from all posts and sends them to google.

      Like

  4. I’m really enjoying this series. Amazon keywords is one topic I am really confused about. Everyone thinks they have cracked the code. (and they will sell you the answer for a nominal fee. lol) thanks for the insight.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much, glad you like the series 🙂
      I worked in online retail before, listing products on Amazon and Ebay for a pet food company, so I learned a little bit there too. It took me a while to get my head around it, but my work experience in publishing really clarified things 🙂
      People will sell anything given half a chance 😛

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Pingback: Author Toolbox Blog Hop: Article Listing – E.M.A. Timar·

  6. AWesome post topic. I have a graphic design background too and learned about meta data and keywords while dabbling in website design. I lnever thought about the importance in writing though. Thank you so much 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, glad you liked it 🙂 It’s amazing what you can learn from graphic design and website design. I learned a fair bit working in online retail with newsletters and product descriptions too: We all have lots of transferable skills. I never thought one day my office job would come in handy!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I’ve seen/heard a lot of authors get freaked out at the mention of metadata, but it’s not as complex as it sounds – at least, not the way you’ve explained it.

    One question: are you allowed to use the names of comparable titles or authors as keywords on Amazon? That seems like something that could be abused by a less scrupulous author.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Glad I made it a little simpler 🙂
      I’m unsure about amazon. From working in retail, I know they have very strict rules on just about everything (If you list on amazon, it breaks terms to list the same item cheaper on your website!)
      I would guess that, so long as your book really is very similar, it would be okay.

      Like

  8. wow. up until a few moments ago i believed the meta data were a few numbers or something sinister like that. they come as opf files and they don’t open on my pc and i never really tried researching it, even if i’m planning to self-publish soon and i know amazon asks for it. I believed i’d need professional guidance for it, so I always thought i’d tackle that when the time came. I feel thoroughly dumb.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Don’t worry, you’re not alone 🙂 Before I found out what meta data was, I avoided it because I was convinced it involved html or other computer programming code. The word just sounds technical or mathematical (and I dislike that side of computing too!)
      Good luck with self publishing 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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